Projects

What kinds of projects are done at CSR?

CSR has conducted a wide range of projects. We have worked on behalf of academic researchers, government agencies, private foundations, businesses, and non-profit organizations.

CSR is experienced with an array of contact modes:

  • Telephone interviewing (with WinCATI)
  • Mail-out survey and contact services
  • Web-based data collection
  • In-person interviewing

CSR has recently purchased Quatlrics which allows for the creation and implementation of sophisticated, user friendly online surveys. Qualtrics can be used to schedule both reminder and thank-you emails based on completion of the survey.

What services does CSR provide?
CSR is a full-service research facility. We offer customized project design, professional interviewing, and data collection using the latest survey technologies, as well as data analysis and report preparation.

How much does it cost to do a survey?
CSR's rates are competitive with other academic and commercial survey organizations. Project costs can vary widely depending on factors such as the scope of services you require, the survey methodology used, the number of respondents, the nature of the sample, etc. Costs can range anywhere from $5,000 to $150,000. So while typical projects have been in the $20,000 to $50,000 range, we have also done smaller and larger projects. We invite you to contact one of our senior staff to discuss the scope of your project and factors that govern cost.

What's the best way to collect data for my project?
CSR can advise you on the most productive and cost-effective method for collecting your data: telephone, mail, electronically, or in-person. CSR ensures scientific validity of your study by helping specify procedures for selecting respondents within households, securing cooperation, and following up incomplete interviews or questionnaires.

Who writes the questions for my survey?
CSR can write the question for you or can assist you in writing your own. We will help you determine the best question formats to measure people's opinions, experiences, attitudes, and behaviors. We can advise you on the proper sequencing of items, a critical design feature for maintaining objectivity and ensuring that respondents understand your questions.

Can I get a copy of one of your old reports?
Most are available for a nominal fee. Contact Ila Crawford for details and specific costs.

Custom Project Design

We will help you clarify your study objectives and advise you on how to get the most research value from available resources.

building
Data Collection

We specialize in the use of Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing and Personal Interviewing.

data
How We Collect Useful Data

CSR prepares statistical analyses and reports of survey results ranging from simple tabulations to authoritative, in-depth narrative reports.

data

Search Completed Projects

Surgical Outcomes Instrument Development

Instrument to be developed for mail-out survey about effect on anesthesiologists of adverse event in OR including most recent most memorable and all events;_x000D_pretest results used for grant submission for production study

APCO 2007 Dr Partnerships

This was a mail survey of a random sample of 1 329 physicians in the U.S. and Canada stratified by country and physician type (general practitioner or specialist). The survey asked physicians about opinions about the direction of the profession in general aids and hindrances to practicing medicine time spent on various activities as a percentage of the typical day impacts of insurance companies and governments patient relationships perceived support from various types of organizations opinions about physician advocacy opinions about pharmaceutical companies and demographics. The protocol included an advance letter a survey packet with a $2 U.S. Jefferson bill for U.S. physicians or a $2 Canadian coin (“toonie”) as a token of appreciation a generic thank-you/reminder post card a second survey packet sent by two-day Priority Mail to nonrespondents a second thank-you/reminder post card to nonrespondents and telephone reminder calls to nonrespondents. The unweighted AAPOR RR3 response rate was 25.9% (26.7% U.S. 23.8% Canadian).

First Destinations

This was a survey of all fourth year undergraduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students were asked to participate in the survey in the early spring just prior to graduation. The survey ask students what they anticipated their "first destination" to be upon graduation. Students were then surveyed in the fall immediately following graduation to see how closely their information matched what they actually did after graduation.

BioX Curriculum Evaluation

CSR assisted faculty researchers at San Jose State University to evaluate a curriculum experiment for teaching MEB (Material and Energy Balance). The SJSU researchers and their partners administered paper surveys of students at five universities at the end of the course and web-based surveys to faculty who teach chemical engineering. There were 126 completed student surveys and 62 completed faculty surveys. CSR performed data manipulation and data analysis.

HSF Employee Engagement Survey

CSR assisted the UVa Health Service Foundation in analyzing the results of its 2007 Employee Engagement Survey comparing these results to those from 2006. HSF had designed the survey and collected data via the Internet and paper questionnaires. CSR provided a narrative report presenting 2006 results 2007 results and a comparative statistical analysis of the two years.

Aid and Application Awareness 2008

Survey of high school seniors and their decisions about going to college. Initial survey in the fall interviewed parents as well as students before applications were due. Respondents had the choice of responding on the web or by mail. Parents had to actively consent before students could be contacted. A Valentine's Day postcard was sent to students to keep an active line of communication open. Advance letters and emails were sent directly to students for the Spring questionnaires. Students were guided to the web version as easier and quicker. Most chose to use this method. Initial mailing was to 1100 parents and kids and with follow up responding students in Spring 08. Incentives of $20 for the Fall surveys $25 for the Spring survey awith an advance of $2 with the questionnaire itself. 623 students finished both questionnaires.

PWC Citizen Satisfaction Survey 2008

This survey was designed to determine residents’ opinions about quality of life in Prince William County to determine residents’ level of satisfaction with a number of services the County provides and to measure citizen opinion about the way in which the County is managing growth and development. Of particular interest was whether or not citizen opinion has changed on some key issues since the 1993 survey also conducted by CSR. New features of this year’s survey are the inclusion of cell-phone respondents and the addition of new questions related to the County’s immigration policy adopted by the County Board of Supervisors in July 2007 and implemented by the Police Department in Spring 2008.

Civil Commitment Study

In support of the work of the Commission on Mental Health Law Reform CSR assisted Dr. McGarvey with advanced statistical analyses including cluster analysis of data describing details of commitment proceedings statewide and characteristics of the persons who were subjects of these proceedings.

Student Health--ALC Norming Survey '03

CSR assisted the Department of Student Health with its third annual norming survey of alcohol use by UVA students by designing a stratified sampling plan for the survey. Margins of error were optimized in the design by examining response rates and descriptive statistics from the prior year’s survey.

Need Assessment for Adult Autism Care

CSR provided data analysis and consultation on data reporting to the Virginia Institute of Autism (VIA) for a web-based survey of families with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders to determine future treatment and support needs. The survey was independently designed and executed by VIA. There were 210 respondents to the survey. VIA prepared a written report of the results using CSR data analyses and consultation from CSR.

Reston Community Center

Telephone survey of residents of Small District #5 Reston VA. Questions addressed RCC name recognition mission statement use of facilities and governance.

Albemarle County Focus Group

Follow up on Albemarle County project. Survey participants were invited to join in a focus group asking for feedback on the County's efforts to communicate with citizens and solicit their input.

UVA Law School Class of 1990

The Class of 1990 Study is the first systematic attempt to find out how satisfied graduates of the University of Virginia School of Law are with their professional careers and with other key aspects of their lives. Experiences after Law School will help to define what makes a student’s time in school both beneficial and productive.

HR Restructuring (VT)

In July 2006 Virginia approved the Restructured Higher Education Financial and Administrative Operations Act which gives state universities freedom to control areas such as personnel management. The Human Resources Staff of both universities collaborated closely with CSR to construct a common questionnaire to respond to this action. The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive survey of the supervisors and staff of Virginia Tech and the University of Virginia to assess their attitudes toward human resources policies. The results of the survey were used to guide the restructuring process of the institutions’ human resources practices. The principle mode was internet with telephone reminders and some paper completions.

HR Restructuring (UVA)

In July 2006 Virginia approved the Restructured Higher Education Financial and Administrative Operations Act which gives state universities freedom to control areas such as personnel management. The Human Resources Staff of both universities collaborated closely with CSR to construct a common questionnaire to respond to this action. The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive survey of the supervisors and staff of Virginia Tech and the University of Virginia to assess their attitudes toward human resources policies. The results of the survey were used to guide the restructuring process of the institutions’ human resources practices. The principle mode was internet with telephone reminders and some paper completions.
Project ID Title Principal Investigators
3.005 Northern Shenandoah Valley Regional Workforce Survey 2003 Tom Guterbock & Robin Bebel
3.004 American College of Radiology David Hartman
3.003 Rappahanock-Rapidan (PD9) Regional Labor Force Survey Tom Guterbock
3.002 Catastrophic Event Survey of Emergency Room Physicians Tom Guterbock
3.001 Durham Survey of Inter-Ethnic Conflict Tom Guterbock
2.020 Prince William County Citizen Satisfaction 2003 Tom Guterbock
2.017 Williamsburg Older Adults Tom Guterbock
2.016 ETS (Educational Testing Service) Tom Guterbock
2.015 Pilot Survey of Oxycontin Abuse Tom Guterbock
2.014 DMV Customer Satisfaction 2002-2003 David Hartman
2.013 Bryn Mawr II Tom Guterbock
2.012 ACRL 2002 Annual Survey of Academic and Research Libraries Tom Guterbock
2.011 Youth Leadership Initiative
2.009 City of Charlottesville -- Cable Service Tom Guterbock
2.007 Ethical Regulations for Innovative Surgery Tom Guterbock
2.006 Ethical Issues Among Nurse Practitioners Tom Guterbock
2.004 Darden 1st Year Tom Guterbock
2.003 AAPOR Evaluations Tom Guterbock
2.002 Darden 2nd year Tom Guterbock
2.001 AAPOR Certificates
1999.019 UVA Health System Roanoke Area Tracking Survey Tom Guterbock
1999.018 DMV Motor Carrier Satisfaction Survey Tom Guterbock
1999.017 DMV Customer Satisfaction Survey Tom Guterbock
1999.016 ACRL Annual Survey of Academic and Research Libraries Tom Guterbock & Patrick Yott
1999.012 TJPDC Origin/Destination Travel Survey Tom Guterbock
1999.003 UVA ITC Customer Satisfaction Survey Tom Guterbock
1999.002 Prince William County Citizen Satisfaction Survey Tom Guterbock & Kate Wood & Brian Me
1998.023 DMV Customer Satisfaction Survey Tom Guterbock & Tom Guterbock
1998.018 NCAA Eligibility Survey II Tom Guterbock
1998.016 Survey on Software Aspects of Certification Tom Guterbock
1998.015 Bureau of Land Management Recreation Comment Cards Tom Guterbock
1998.013 Workplace Managed Care (SAMSA) Mary Ropka
1998.0122 Class Poll (Campaign Conduct) Tom Guterbock
1998.0121 Survey of Campaign Conduct 1999 Tom Guterbock
1998.011 Consumer Knowledge and Perceptions Pilot Study Tom Guterbock
1998.009 Covenant Marriage Focus Groups Steven Nock
1998.008 Focus Groups: Development of Computer-Based Tools for Mid-life Breast Cancer Survivors Mary Ropka
1998.007 Survey of Hospice Support Programs Tom Guterbock
1998.006 Departmental Factors in Undergraduate Attrition from the Majors Tom Guterbock
1998.005 Clark Elementary School Neighborhood Task Force Survey Tom Guterbock & Brian Meekins
1998.004 Prince William County Department of Safety Survey Lea Cunningham
1998.003 Prince William County Citizen Satisfaction Survey Tom Guterbock & Kate Wood
1998.002 Patient Satisfaction with Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center Mary Ropka
1998.001 UVA ITC Customer Satisfaction Survey Tom Guterbock
1997.020 Course Evaluations Brian Meekins & Ryan Hubbard
1997.019 Virginia High School League Survey Tom Guterbock
1997.018 Process Simplification Survey Tom Guterbock
1997.017 DMV Customer Satisfaction Telephone Survey Tom Guterbock
1997.015 Virginia Gubernatorial Pre-Election Poll Tom Guterbock
1997.014 Child Care Survey Tom Guterbock